Transforming the applied arts since 1897
NEW additions to Designs or Rarity - View Now

MoorcroftPRestige designs

Prestige designs are amongst the most sought after pieces to emerge from Moorcroft’s kilns, and have been ever since the first pieces were made over a century ago.  They are often pieces not only prestigious in size, but often with highly intricate, complex and captivating design subject matter.  Due to the very nature of their size, which can be up to almost 70ms in height, it can take many weeks for a single piece to be made from start to finish. For this very reason the majority of prestige designs are made to order, due to limited capacity at Moorcroft’s 1913 factory in Stoke-on-Trent, but each piece is certainly worth waiting for, as few can surpass a Prestige Moorcroft vase. 

A vast array of prestige vases made over the past 100 years can be seen on display in the Moorcroft Museum, each a breath-taking example of Moorcroft art pottery.  The Jerusalem vase created to commemorate the new millennium in 2000, sold out within six weeks, each piece priced at over £11,000.  In more recent times Prestige designs have been on display at the Lord Mayor of London’s Mansion House, Kensington Palace, Blackwell the Arts and Craft House, Cannon Hall, and The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery, with pieces such as the Glasgow School of Art creating international attention, as an homage to Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Prestige pieces are often numbered or limited editions, and marked accordingly on the base. Here you will find the specific edition number of the piece, and additional appeal for the connoisseur comes from the fact that prestige pieces also carry the designers’ signature fired underglaze, as well as the informative array of Moorcroft markings. 

 

Designer Anji Davenport

In 2000 Anji Davenport’s Woodside Farm was launched with great hope. For the first time, a countryside range designed with the innate emotions of a farmer’s daughter, Angela Davenport, captured the very spirit of winter. Anji returns with a prestige offering to excite the senses. Woodside Farm has now grown, more farm buildings have been erected and a vicarage now supports the church. This time the foxes have a new friend, and a barn owl oversees the quiet rumblings of a Massey Ferguson tractor. Sheep and cows quietly go about their business under a setting sun, and the walker can enjoy his wanderings amongst the sharpened colours of the tubelining. In the morning, the glistening white snow may no longer hark to this romantic rural idyll. For now, all can bask in the wonderful colours and imagery on this prestige vase.


Designer Paul Hilditch

A city’s gate becomes the docking port for the imagination. You wander into a world where horse drawn carriages stampede through streets filled with merchants scurrying around with barrels and baskets, as others stand in clusters displaying their ware and bartering. Set apart by their attire, gentlemen in top hats and ladies wearing long, bustled skirts and bonnets, walk proudly in tight, stiff collars, into architecture of a bygone time. Quaint, steep pitched roofs with overhangs and dormers allow the romanticism of ‘Merrie Olde England’ to engulf you. Epic in scale, this prestige vase can only be described as enchanting, with elegant black and white timber façades holding curiosities around every corner of this Hilditch masterpiece of Moorcroft design and tubelining. 


Designer Nicola Slaney

Nicola’s design has its roots in the front cover of ‘Select Poems of Robert Burns.’ Two doves mirror each other in birdsong, framing a bouquet of Glasgow roses invented by Macintosh himself. Nicola selected many elements from this subculture of book cover art so the lines, arrows, hearts, leaves and dashes can be seen throughout. She had a deliberate colour scheme in mind before she designed Talwin, knowing that blacks, reds and pinks are synonymous with the style she was trying to recreate. As ever with Moorcroft designers, in all their work they bring their own perfunctory flare and we also see the very delicate greens and blues which Nicola is so often drawn to quite naturally herself. It is an absolute pleasure to see how Nicola continues to channel her devotion to, what she describes as, ‘one of my absolute favourite Moorcroft influences.’


Designer Kerry Goodwin

Kerry Goodwin can pick a subject and no matter how sensitive or profound the theme, can relay a meaningful thing of beauty. Lest We Forget is a design which directly pulls from the mud-swathed trenches, the brutal weapons of destruction and barren, scarred landscape. But watching over the derelict battlefield are the silhouettes of the soldiers who paid the ultimate price for their country and surviving amongst the destruction are poppies, insects and birds. Lest We Forget cleverly combines the harsh reality of warfare with a serene reminder of the return to nature and renewal of life after death. The name of the design comes from the masterful poetry of Rudyard Kipling who, in the same year that William Moorcroft first started designing, wrote ‘Recessional’.


Designer Rachel Bishop

Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae (1872-1918) an officer in the Canadian Army, wrote a poem called ‘In Flanders Field’ which reflected the sweet voice of creativity amidst the destructive forces of war. Rachel Bishop, touched by his words, decided to design a prestige vase which would restore a natural world almost destroyed by man and war by using a heavenly tune as her own personal tribute to all those of a brave and creative heart whose lives were stolen from them before their time. Delicate butterflies flutter effortlessly in fields of golden corn, while rich, blazing-red poppies rise triumphantly from the earth at the base of a fine, prestige vase.


Designer Nicola Slaney

Victorian graphic artist, Talwin Morris, was Nicola’s inspiration for this brilliant range of Moorcroft pieces, but as ever with Moorcroft designers, in all their work, bring their own individual flair.  In Talwin we see very delicate greens and blues mixed subtly with, purples, reds and black.  Nicola gladly shares this magnificent design said by Moorcroft to be one of the greatest collaborations between past and present in Moorcroft history.  Moorcroft connoisseurs would wholeheartedly agree. 


Designer Emma Bossons FRSA

Anyone with just the slightest interest in Moorcroft, will know that the work of Mackintosh has played a great role in the evolution of Moorcroft and, inevitably, has been a huge influence on Moorcroft designers. Mackintosh roses are a worldwide symbol of design excellence; his building designs have been a bedrock inspiration for modern architects. Emma’s evocative design, on this brand new Moorcroft shape, is a touching vision of the building lost to a devastating fire in May 2014. Emotive shades of blues and lilac are the only colours to grace the vase, in which delicately etched window panes meet iconic iron railings. With heads bowing in respect, Mackintosh’s willowy female forms wisp their way to the heavens, with heads crowned in dotted halos.


Designer Kerry Goodwin

Due to the popularity of the 2009 House of Flowers plaque Kerry Goodwin was invited to create a prestige version of her groundbreaking design. While the flowers on the vase remain the same, Kerry has added three additional landscape scenes between the flowers, each with a stylised garden gate. Each scene is different, some buildings have staircases, others have turrets or spires and all are in the Arts and Crafts style with tulips that burst into enchanting violet and burgundy hues as they soar up to the heavens. Each piece is numbered and signed.


Designer Rachel Bishop

From Sally Tuffin back in the 1980s we had Red Tulip and the more sombre Black Tulip and from William Moorcroft, a selection of Blue Tulip pieces made between 1899 and 1902.  Senior Designer, Rachel Bishop, took a leaf from William's book and followed the well-trodden and familiar path to Blue Tulip on her favouite and prestigious 159/18 shape, with a hint of Florianesque line work in the framed panels that Rachel favours.


Designer Paul Hilditch

Imagery of London, old and new, is captured on this prestige vase.  It offers an architectural journey spanning an era from the early eighteenth century St Paul’s Cathedral to a contemporary building informally known as the Gherkin built in the heart of the City of London itself.  Whilst the River Thames reflects the ever-changing city skyline above its banks, the river itself is a symbol of constancy in an ever-evolving world.  Ornate lamp posts from a past age line the river’s edge, while red London buses trundle alongside the Thames, passing decades of culture and history on their way.


Designer Paul Hilditch

Undetectable from Kensington High Street, a hidden grade-II-listed garden steeped in sumptuous structures, luscious plants and glamourous finishing-touches overlooks the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. A Spanish Garden, a Tudor Garden and an English Woodland make the trio of themes which form this Rooftop Paradise and within these three spaces, you can lose yourself in the depths of your imagination. Nowhere else in the world will you find Mediterranean plants, old English bricks and woodland trees, crocuses, muscari, snowdrops and flamingos- all upon a roof. By expertly encapsulating this garden haven into clay, Paul has pulled an extraordinary London quirk into an artistic apparition, visible from within three ornate arches.


Designer Emma Bossons FRSA

Queens Choice, considered by many to be the most successful Moorcroft range ever, was inspired by Shakespeare's play 'A Mid-Summer Night's Dream,'.  Every fruit mentioned by Shakespeare in Queen Titania’s speech features in Emma's design 'Be kind and courteous to this gentleman; Hop in his walks and gambol in his eyes; Feed him with apricots and dewberries; With purple grapes, green figs and mulberries...'.  All we need to do is to look at the linework and colour by lifting Emma’s remarkable collection and watch artistic history revealing itself in a contemporary idiom. 


Designer Vicky Lovatt

In each third of the vase, Derwent Reservoir is pictured with the 617 Squadron practising the low-level flights needed for Operation Chastise or ‘Dam Busters’. Occasional flypasts of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight at the reservoir are still staged to commemorate the events during the war. In September 2014, a unique and never to be repeated flypast took place involving the two remaining airworthy Lancasters, one from the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight, and one from Canada, flying three passes in formation. On this prestige vase, that tribute is preserved forever. 


Designer Emma Bossons FRSA

The parallels between Moorcroft pottery and the work of William De Morgan, potter and tile designer born in 1839, has not gone unnoticed by the Moorcroft Designer Studio. Dark blue, turquoise, manganese purple, green, Indian red, and lemon yellow are colours which were typically used in ?znik pottery, the precursor to this style. For her beloved Moorcroft, Emma has summoned their presence yet again. Her chosen shape was the art pottery’s statement centrepiece bowl, which to this day, is one of the most difficult shapes on which a Moorcroft designer can work and for artists to handle. Inevitably, this makes the gracious bowl one of the most time consuming to finish. Magic, mystery and fantasy enshroud the gryphons of Persia, to offer a truly exotic and bewitching piece of art pottery. 


Designer Kerry Goodwin

A Prestige Collection by Moorcroft would not be complete without flowers, which have always been a favoured subject amongst designers in that coveted Designer Studio, but whatever your stance, lupins are a fine example of prestigious perfection in nature.  In leaving the focus is on their magnificent, upright, clustered structures, where the viewer can appraise each individual flower as it unfolds from the rest.  Like red-hot spears or colourful clouds of confetti, the lupins on this prestigious design torpedo into the sky, thirsty for sunlight. As long as flowers keep flowering, artists will keep admiring their awesome colours and structures.


Designer Rachel Bishop

The combination of the inaugural appearance of this prestige shape, and the striking, bold irises that leap gloriously off this design, give an almost three dimensional effect. Clever Art Nouveau outlines and shading from the Senior Moorcroft designer have made one of Rachel’s favourite subjects look almost tangible and ready to pick. The design is so clear, so colourful and so inviting, the fact its ingredients are a simple combination of clay, metallic oxides and glaze, becomes little more than a distant memory. How could something so organic and earthly look so exceptional? Moorcroft may be fine Art Pottery but it is far removed from the earthly hues that spring to mind on mention of clay and colours of the earth. Indeed, Inviting Iris lives in a world of its own. A glistening, tactile world where clarity and precision reign supreme. 


SECURE ONLINE PAYMENT PARTNERS

© Moorcroft 2017 / Terms & Conditions / Web Design Company